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(Harriet, Countess Gower, afterwards Duchess of Sutherland)

(Five autograph letters, signed, written to her uncle Rev.Henry Howard by Harriet, Countess Gower (afterwards Duchess of Sutherland); together with single autograph letters, signed, written to him by Elizabeth, Marchioness of Stafford (Harriet’s mother-in-law), 1830, and by George, 2nd Duke of Sutherland (Harriet’s husband), 1847)

(Five autograph letters, signed, written to her uncle Rev.Henry Howard by Harriet, Countess Gower (afterwards Duchess of Sutherland); together with single autograph letters, signed, written to him by Elizabeth, Marchioness of Stafford (Harriet’s mother-in-law), 1830, and by George, 2nd Duke of Sutherland (Harriet’s husband), 1847)

(Letters are dated 11 August 1823, 28 April 1825, 7 October 1825, 26 November 1828, 29 August 1832; 12 July 1830; and 12 April 1847)

Reference: 15345
Price: £175 [convert currency]

Full Description

Seven autograph letters, signed, written in ink, folded as sent, respectively of 8pp, 4pp, 8pp, 12pp, 5pp, 2pp and 4pp.

A group of affectionate letters written to Rev.Henry Howard, Dean of Lichfield, by his niece Harriet, Countess Gower (afterwards Duchess of Sutherland), together with two related letters from his niece’s relatives by marriage. The most interesting letters are those written by Harriet in August 1823, when newly married and on her way to stay with her husband’s formidable parents in Scotland (where she had evidently never been before her marriage); in November 1828, giving a long account of a recent visit to Germany by her husband and herself, on which they went as far as Silesia to see “some very old friends of his – The Williams of Prussia [the future Kaiser Wilhelm I, whom she found “most pleasing & unaffected and very handsome”, and his wife], and P[rince} and P[rinces]s Louisa Radziwill” (one wonders if Harriet’s husband explained to her that in his youth he had fallen deeply in love with the future Kaiser’s mother); and that of August 1832, written while Harriet and her husband was staying on the Sutherland family’s Highland estates for the first time since 1823, and in which she speaks warmly of the improvements brought about by James Loch, the family’s estate manager who did much to encourage economic development in that part of the Highlands, although also responsible for ousting a good proportion of the existing crofter population (”Loch is still here enjoying his works & the rich border of arable land that has sprung up under his fertilising feet”)