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(Lord Overstone)

(Three autograph letters, signed, written by Samuel Jones Loyd, 1st Baron Overstone, to his brother-in-law Rev. Henry Howard, Dean of Lichfield ; with a further autograph letter, signed, written by Overstone to the Dean’s widow shortly after the Dean’s death)

(Three autograph letters, signed, written by Samuel Jones Loyd, 1st Baron Overstone, to his brother-in-law Rev. Henry Howard, Dean of Lichfield ; with a further autograph letter, signed, written by Overstone to the Dean’s widow shortly after the Dean’s death)

Letters are dated 6 February 1850, 26 January 1856, 27 January 1856 and 15 October 1868.

Reference: 15342
Price: £140 [convert currency]

Full Description

Four autograph letters signed, written in ink, folded as sent, and respectively of 4pp; 3pp; 2pp; and 4pp.

Of the group of four letters offered here, the most significant one is the letter of 6 February 1850, in which Jones Loyd (1796-1883), the ablest London banker of his generation, explains at some length to his brother-in-law, the Dean of Lichfield, that the then recent offer of a peerage to him by Lord John Russell “was unsolicited unexpected and certainly not desired by me” but that “it now remains for me to endeavour faithfully to discharge the duties of my new position”, although “you must not expect me to see me taking part in the public debates of the House or endeavouring to assume a prominent role in political life”. In the letter of 26 January 1856 Lord Overstone, as he had then become, writes to the Dean to tell him that in view of the fact that he had learned that the Dean had been “a heavy sufferer by the recent failure of the Lichfield Bank, to an extent not much short of a thousand pounds”, he, Lord Overstone, was sending him as a gift a bank draft “for the immediate convenience of your family”, and, in a second letter, written the following day, stresses to the Dean that he must accept the bank draft, as “the thing is done and it cannot be altered”. The final letter is a letter of condolence on the Dean’s death, written by Lord Overstone in a slightly shaky handwriting reflecting his failing sight (although he was to live for another fifteen years and was to leave a personal estate proved at £2,118,803 17s 5d as of 31 December 1883, independently of landed property worth in excess of another £3,000,000 – huge amounts by the standards of the time and vast sums if converted into their 21st century equivalents).